These exercises are designed to help improve your core stability and so give more muscular support to your spine.  It is important that you feel comfortable and stable throughout these exercises.

Ask your chiropractor what size ball would fit you.  They range in size from 45cm to 65cm in diameter.

While doing the core stability exercises it is vital to maintain a good posture – using your deep abdominal muscles and your pelvic floor muscles hold your pelvis in neutral.  (If you are unsure what this means ask your chiropractor.)  Keep your shoulder blades down and relaxed and hold your head above your shoulders, not poking forward.

Ball sitting
Eyes are open.
Have a wide base of support.
Practice maintaining your balance while contracting your abdominal muscles.
Sit tall, feeling as though your lower back is held in its natural curve.

to increase the difficulty of this exercise ...

Bring your legs in close together – narrow base of support.
Close your eyes and balance.
Open your eyes and raise one leg at a time.  Make sure your pelvis doesn’t shift as you raise your leg.

Push down with your supporting leg.

Bridge (a)
Lie on your back with your knees bent.
Raise your buttocks and low back off the floor by contracting your abdominal and buttock muscles.

Keep a straight spine at all time.
Hold for 30 seconds and lower your back and buttocks to the floor (you may have to build up the time you hold it for gradually).

Neck should be relaxed.

Bridge (b)

Repeat this exercise and carefully raise one leg off the floor.
Do not allow your hips to drop, maintain a straight line through your shoulder, hip, knee and foot.
Repeat with the other side.

Ball Bridge

Lie on your back with your shoulders on the ball.  Rest your head and neck on the ball.  Arms spread wide helps stabilize, bring arms in to increase difficulty.
Maintain a straight line through your knees, hips and shoulders.
Raise one leg at a time slowly.

Bird Dog
Start on your hands and knees with your hands directly under your shoulders and your knees under your hips.
Contract your abdominal and pelvic floor muscles.
Slowly raise your right leg and your left arm off the ground.
Do not allow your pelvis to move.
Lower your legs and arms to the ground and repeat with the other side.

Plank
Start by lying on your front.
Contract your abdominal muscles and pelvic floor.
Raise yourself onto your elbows and toes.
(if this is too difficult raise yourself onto your elbows and knees.)
Hold yourself in a straight line.

Dead Bug
Start by lying on your back with your knees bent. Throughout this exercise the spine must be kept in the neutral position with muscle co-contraction held.
Progress through the following movement stages :
1. Straighten one leg, by sliding it along the floor. Repeat with the other leg.
2. Alternately, raise each arm over your head. Then try raising the legs.
3. Raise one arm and the opposite leg together. Repeat the other way round.
4. Keeping all limbs off the ground, move opposite arms and legs alternately.

Dorsal Raises
Lie on your front with the ball comfortably under your abdomen.
Start with your feet touching the floor.
Hold your hands to the sides of your head.
Maintaining an abdominal contraction raise your arms, head and shoulders off the ball until you are in a straight line.
Be careful to avoid over-extending the spine.

Leg Raises

Lie on your front with the ball comfortably under your abdomen.
Start with your hands and feet both touching the floor.
Maintaining an abdominal contraction raise your feet and legs off the floor until you are in a straight line.
Be careful to avoid over-extending the spine.

Ball Balance

When fully comfortable with previous ball exercises, you can attempt to balance on the ball with no points of contact with the floor.

Start by just sitting and lifting the legs up and then progress to kneeling. 

Make sure you are in a safe place with lots of room, be careful and have fun.